AFBC: The American Dream is Not Only for the 'Average' American

Family Matters

​The American dream is often depicted as something along the lines of doing well in school, getting a great job, enjoying a budding family and relaxing with some luxuries that life has to offer. But for many Americans, that ideal can feel like a pipe dream. The housing market isn’t ideal for first-time buyers or those without flawless credit, some job listings state that they want several years of experience and college degrees for an entry-level position, and the pricing of colleges has become nearly synonymous with the need for student loans. American Financial Benefits Center (AFBC), a document preparation service company, wants to tell people, student loan borrowers or not, that there is more than one definition of success, and what is ideal for an individual may not work for anyone else but that one person, and that that is okay.

Differences are meant to be celebrated; that is often said at the least. Someone with different ethnic, economic, and overall societal experiences will have unique ideas that someone else may never come across. But when an individual is seemingly punished by a society for having those differences — for example, not having a financially well-off family, not being white or white-passing, or not aligning with another characteristic that is wrongly misconstrued as average — it instead may tear down an individual’s dreams of living their best life because they feel they will only get what is left over. “An endless grind in life, for a job you hate, with student debt hanging overhead from a degree that may or may not be put to use is hardly anyone’s ideal situation. But from the stories that pop up, personal recounts and opinion pieces, it’s an all too common story right now,” said Sara Molina, manager at AFBC.

What feels often forgotten is that to many people, the original American Dream wasn’t necessarily about success, but freedom. That freedom may have been to be as wildly financially successful as possible, but for others, it is the freedom to make choices for themselves. Being burdened by student loan debt that is too much to handle for various reasons certainly doesn’t cater to the American Dream. “AFBC has helped thousands of borrowers apply for federal income-driven repayment programs that may have lowered their monthly payment and put them on track for student loan forgiveness if they remain in the program for 20-25 years. Because of that, many individuals may have been granted another chance at chasing whatever it is that makes up their American Dream,” said Molina.

An endless grind in life, for a job you hate, with student debt hanging overhead from a degree that may or may not be put to use is hardly anyone's ideal situation. But from the stories that pop up, personal recounts and opinion pieces, it's an all too common story right now.

Sara Molina

Manager at AFBC

About American Financial Benefits Center

American Financial Benefits Center is a document preparation company that helps clients apply for federal student loan repayment plans that fit their personal financial and student loan situation. Through its strict customer service guidelines, the company strives for the highest levels of honesty and integrity.

Each AFBC telephone representative has received the Certified Student Loan Professional certification through the International Association of Professional Debt Arbitrators (IAPDA).

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Contact

To learn more about American Financial Benefits Center, please contact:

American Financial Benefits Center
1900 Powell Street #600
Emeryville, CA 94608
1-800-488-1490
info@afbcenter.com

Source: American Financial Benefits Center


Categories: Financial News, Financing and Student Loans

Tags: American Dream, average american, income-driven repayment, social differences, student debt, student loan repayment, student loans


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American Financial Benefits Center works to align each client with the different U.S Department of Education programs available to them based on their income and occupational situation.