Eyes on the Road/Hands on the Wheel… ASF Delivers Cure for Distracted Driving "Deadly Epidemic!"

The Automobile Safety Foundation road concentration cure tops the all time safety alert list.

Over a million people died in auto accidents last year and many more were seriously injured!

The NHTSA states, “Driver distraction is recognized as one of the most common causes of traffic crashes,” and, “distracted driving is a deadly epidemic that has devastating consequences on our nation's roadways." 

The annual automobile accident rate is truly catastrophic, and based on the laws of probability; the highway makes gamblers of us all! So what can be done to increase road safety and lower the losing odds?

The journey to safety begins with road concentration training, starting with eight miraculous life saving words:  Eyes on the road/hands on the wheel.

ASF espouses the modernization of driver licensing and education, teaching the science and practice of road concentration with a distraction avoidance follow up, see: on http://www.releasewire.com/press-releases/release-595130.htm. Unfortunately too many leave off what they should be doing while doing what they should not, but in this case, doing what is right precludes the wrong.

So it should be noted that if one is driving correctly, with eyes on the road/hands on the wheel, they have eliminated the majority of all driver distractions!

Because the issue focus of government, NHTSA, FCC (distraction.gov) and DMV etc., has been what not to do while driving, rather than road concentration, the absolute chief essential of safe driving. Furthermore, most people have never been taught, and are therefore unaware, that road driving concentration is a challenge that requires extreme discipline, and a constant due diligence. Since humans do not have a ‘stare at the road switch,’ the best that can be done is to recognize this challenge, and do one’s best to address it. The science of road concentration includes driving road vigilance as well as the effort to stave off the many driving distraction temptations, most of which have not been recognized by the driving public, such as passenger distraction, as well as the array of behavioral habits and activities, such as using a GPS, eating, etc.  Eliminating as many driving distraction temptations as possible is indeed another step in the right direction.

So far, the world’s distracted driving focus has been on cell phone use while driving. The cell phone brought the FCC into the automobile and since banks (including their brokerage, mortgage, and credit card divisions) are the most called business in the world, cell phone use while driving now involves banks in regards to auto safety. Banks and other businesses need to abolish their time consuming prompt requests that entice drivers with a dangerous distraction temptation, in favor of voice activation. ASF seeks to modernize telephone banking internationally, and has petitioned the major banks and OCC to adopt Express Calling with some success: http://www.releasewire.com/press-releases/release-595130.htm.ASF.

The modernization of telephone banking also improves communication proficiency and account security! ASF continues this campaign today, and requests the participation of government and all those concerned with driving safety. Are your bank or business acting “socially responsible”, modernizing communications and improving telephone banking, or do they still cling to the old outdated twentieth century technology?

All the above clearly signals a need for a new psychology to road travel akin to pilot and passenger demeanor during air travel. “Put your seats in the upright position, fasten your seat belts, and prepare for departure…” are the opening lines in the video “Eyes on the Road/Hand on the Wheel” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11s8xERlVpU) that includes an important heads up about passenger distraction, “The driver can talk to you but cannot look at you. Do not distract the driver.”

 Wait a second, hold on a minute for this urgent bulletin: Road travel involves a multitude of vehicles traveling in conjunction at high speed on a (potential) immediate collision course, every split second, while air travel is basically free and clear per take off! Based on this, the thinking person could easily conclude that it is time for a new driving vigilance protocol in that automotive cockpit. This revelation requires a new intelligent driving approach.

Here is a profound idea: why not double down for safety, and have the front seat passenger (of age) engage in road concentration. Since two heads can be better than one, ASF has introduced the Copilot License see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5FwyYvBMrM . ASF believes it would be sagacious to enlist safe driving participation from the front seat passenger (they have a stake in arriving safely) inviting them to watch the road and handle communications. Please consider that the “co” prefix is Latin for “working together” and driving safety could really benefit from the cooperation. Additionally, DMV licensing and educators could issue CL licenses for safety and new revenues. We are all copilots on the roads together!

No one escapes automobile dangers, not even pedestrians! So speaking of cooperation and social responsibility, ASF calls on all those involved in driving safety from government to private sector to “team for auto safety” and obtain the ASF literature and video copyrights in an effort to communicate this life saving information to all.

“Is it a greater miracle to feed five thousand men with five loaves than to overthrow all the armies of Europe with a small pamphlet,” wrote the great poet William Blake about his friend Thomas Paine’s small pamphlet, “Common Sense,” a small book that led to the overthrow of a major tyranny!

Do you believe in miracles?

 ASF invites everyone to Team for Auto Safety, and help communicate just eight words, Eyes on the Road/Hands on the Wheel, and take part in the miracle of saving lives worldwide, each and every day!

For Media Inquires or more information please contact:

info@carsafe.org
​www.carsafe.org
(858) 834-4345