Ameritech Financial: Two Thousand Years of Living With Less to Have More and How Student Loans Fit In

Saint Lucius

For at least 2,000 years, from Seneca to Thoreau to well-off minimalists to conservative financial talk show hosts, thought leaders have championed living with what one needs instead of what one wants. This is especially striking now, as millions of borrowers struggle with the collective weight of $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. For many of these individuals, minimalism might be a necessity, rather than an option, but still can be embraced. Ameritech Financial, a document preparation company that helps borrowers apply for and maintain enrollment in federal repayment programs such as income-driven repayment plans (IDRs), encourages living within one’s means and separating wants from needs.

“The most important things aren’t things, right?” asks Tom Knickerbocker, executive vice president of Ameritech Financial. “We can help you navigate the sometimes-complex IDR enrollment process, which may possibly lower that monthly student loan payment enough that you will have time to enjoy your life, even if it isn’t filled with ‘things.’”

Seneca was a philosopher and advisor to Nero and, though wealthy, advocated for and at least sometimes lived simply. He lived in a period of great wealth and observed how unsatisfied and unhappy people were even though they had huge villas and hundreds of slaves. He said that “It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor.” He advocated self-sufficiency, including not needing the approval of others: “Be your own spectator, seek your own applause.”

We can help you navigate the sometimes-complex IDR enrollment process, which may possibly lower that monthly student loan payment enough that you will have time to enjoy your life, even if it isn't filled with 'things.'

Tom Knickerbocker

Executive Vice President of Ameritech Financial

Thoreau, too, famously lived “deliberately,” leaving society, at least temporarily, for life in the woods near Walden Pond. “A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone,” he said. Thoreau was a political dissident and abolitionist who died before slavery was ended. He was also a transcendentalist, a naturalist and author who said: “My greatest skill has been to want but little.”

More recently, creators of The Minimalists, Joshua Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus, found themselves nearly 30 years old, successful and working 80 hours per week “just to buy more stuff.” Starting in 2009, they began taking back control of their lives and, by 2011, quit their corporate jobs and began living with less and giving more time and money to social causes. Friends since childhood, they gained acclaim writing and speaking as missionaries for “cleaning the clutter from life’s path.”

Though in some ways he couldn’t be more different than socially progressive millennials, Dave Ramsey is famous for succinctly expressing a similar idea. “Don’t  buy stuff you can’t afford with money you don’t have to impress people you don’t really like.” Though phrased differently, the sentiment echoes Seneca, Thoreau and The Minimalists. Ramsey is a straightforward, “no-nonsense” conservative who, as a taxpayer, doesn’t want to pay for someone because they were “young and stupid.” Though unsympathetic to “whiners,” he promises to help anyone willing to do the work necessary to get out of debt and move forward in their lives.

No matter the source, to the huge number of Americans living with student loan debt, embracing minimalism can be a way to empowerment while working through challenging financial circumstances. Ameritech Financial specializes in self-empowerment by helping borrowers find and apply for federally available repayment programs that are right for them.

“Most people don’t want to live minimally forever, especially if it’s not a choice,” said Knickerbocker. “But embracing the concept of not needing more stuff to feel good, to spend only the resources you have and to be uncaring about what other people think can be a valuable way to live your life.”

About Ameritech Financial

Ameritech Financial is a private company located in Rohnert Park, California. Ameritech Financial has already helped thousands of consumers with financial analysis and student loan document preparation to apply for federal student loan repayment programs offered through the Department of Education.

Each Ameritech Financial telephone representative has received the Certified Student Loan Professional certification through the International Association of Professional Debt Arbitrators (IAPDA).

Ameritech Financial prides itself on its exceptional customer service.

Ameritech Financial Newsroom

Contact

To learn more about Ameritech Financial, please contact:

Ameritech Financial
5789 State Farm Drive #265
Rohnert Park, CA 94928
1-800-792-8621
media@ameritechfinancial.com

Source: Ameritech Financial


Categories: Financial News, Financing and Student Loans

Tags: income-driven repayment, minimalism, needs vs wants, Seneca, student debt, student loan repayment, student loans, Thoreau


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Ameritech Financial is a document preparation company that helps borrowers enroll in the federal repayment program that matches their individual financial needs, potentially lowers payments and gets them on track for student loan forgiveness.

Ameritech Financial
5789 State Farm Drive, 265 (265)
Rohnert Park, CA 94928
United States